That’s not what football…

On the TunneySide of Sports October 30, 2017 #664 “That’s not what football…

On the TunneySide of Sports October 30, 2017 #664 Up next… That’s not what football…

After further review…A recent pile-up of NFL players resulted in one player kicking an opponent after the play was over. There was nothing apparent that provoked the player who delivered the kick. A teammate of the player who was kicked responded by saying, “That’s not what football is all about.” That same perpetrator was disciplined last year with a five-game suspension for a late hit on a defenseless player. Some players just don’t get it!

Further, before a Thursday night game a couple of weeks ago, the introduction by Ving Rhames was a promotional monologue that romanticized competition fueled by temporary hate. I have admired Rhames not only as an actor but for his magnanimous gesture two decades ago when he gave his Oscar to Jack Lemmon because “giving back is what this profession is all about.” However, Rhames could have declined this spot. No matter how tongue-in-cheek it was intended to be, his incitement of a hateful state of mind was in poor taste. I could imagine young athletes watching that piece thinking that they must hate their upcoming opponent.

Football has been around for over a century, but lately has been criticized for the damage it may cause to the brain and the body. In the last two weeks, two NFL quarterbacks have been lost for this season with injuries. There is no question that football is physically tough on players. Today, many parents wonder whether they should allow their sons to participate. These concerns are real and are shared by a wide sampling of families. I have a son who played, and a grandson playing today at the high school level. Hmmm.

Over the years it has been said that sports teach discipline, e.g., boundaries. The league and teams have rules which all players must follow. In the TunneySide’s view, some of these boundaries seem to have diminished as players act on an exaggerated sense of freedom to express themselves however they please. One such boundary was ignored recently when a player ran from the bench to intervene in a fight that broke out on the field. Said player ran onto the field and in the process, grabbed an official. He was suspended for the next game.

Is hatred a part of playing football, or for that matter any sport? Not in the TunneySide way of approaching competition. One should approach competition with an attitude of gratitude based on preparation, and focus. It’s one’s effort and determination that counts. Respect for an opponent will serve you well in all you do.

Will you play to win, yet respect your opponents as you want them to respect you?

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To contact Jim, go to JimTunney.com or email Jim@JimTunney.com.

Jim’s books are full of inspiration and interesting stories. Please visit his online store to learn more.

Another 101 Best of TunneySide of Sports

Be sure to get Jim’s book ‘Another 101 Best of TunneySide of Sports’ by clicking this link or using the email above to contact Jim directly.

These TunneySides take issues from real-life situations and relate them as inspiration for the betterment of others.

Jim is available for speaking engagements on leadership and T*E*A*M Building. His books are available for $20 which includes shipping and tax. The Tunney Bobblehead is available for $30. Please visit JimTunney.com. Thank you!

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Careful what you ask for!

On the TunneySide of Sports October 23, 2017 #663.1 Up next…Careful what you ask for!

On the TunneySide of Sports October 23, 2017 #663 Up next… Careful What You Ask For!

After further review…Fans have been clamoring for the use of video replay as far back as the 1970s. In that era, Tony Verna and Hal Uplinger were creators of the split-screen, where two pictures of different shots are shown simultaneously on your television screen. What Verna and “Uppie” created is said to be the forerunner of today’s video replay. Some 40 years later we see the extensive use of video replay in all professional sports as well as in the NCAA. Some say it’s an attempt to achieve perfection.

Do you like its expanded use? That’s a frivolous question. You’ll get it anyway. With technology improving every day (minute?) fans not only love it but can’t seem to live without it. In its inception in the NFL, players, coaches and other purists thought it would not be good for a game played by humans. Count on-field officials in that group of skeptics. But not this writer, who took the position that if video replay would help correct an official’s inadvertent mistake, it would help the game.

In today’s professional sports we see video replay in constant use. Some say delays caused by replays disrupt the flow of the game, yet we continue to watch replay after reply. In the recent Major League Baseball playoffs, extremely close live-action plays called by the on-field umpires have been overturned by the replay technician in New York (MLB’s command center). One certainly cannot fault those umpires who must make the call in real time.

However, in NCLS Game One of the Chicago Cubs at Los Angeles Dodgers, a close play at the plate caused the TunneySide some concern. As the Dodgers player rounded third and was attempting to score, the Cubs catcher was awaiting the throw to tag him out. The catcher had his left leg extended into the base path with the runner bearing down on home plate. The runner slid around the catcher’s leg and missed touching the plate. The catcher caught the throw and tagged the runner out. The call was challenged as we went to replay in New York.

Replay responded by reporting that the catcher’s extended leg was ruled a violation and awarded the runner safe at home due to the interference. While the ruling is correct, according to the MLB rule book, the concern here is that replay has overtaken the role of the on-field umpires. If this becomes standard, it usurps the role of the on-field officials. It is vastly different than a call of safe or out being overturned.

Will you log-in your thoughts about replay being involved in plays of this nature?

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To contact Jim, go to JimTunney.com or email Jim@JimTunney.com.

Jim’s books are full of inspiration and interesting stories. Please visit his online store to learn more.

Another 101 Best of TunneySide of Sports

Be sure to get Jim’s book ‘Another 101 Best of TunneySide of Sports’ by clicking this link or using the email above to contact Jim directly.

These TunneySides take issues from real-life situations and relate them as inspiration for the betterment of others.

Jim is available for speaking engagements on leadership and T*E*A*M Building. His books are available for $20 which includes shipping and tax. The Tunney Bobblehead is available for $30. Please visit JimTunney.com. Thank you!

Posted in Sports, Tunney Side of Sports Columns | Leave a comment

Role Models

Role models lead by example

On the TunneySide of Sports October 16, 2017 #662 Up Next…Role Models

After further review…We all need role models. How vital are they in the world of sports and society? Can we shape our character without them? Can a nation develop its core values without them? What criteria is used to select the best role models? Be careful in your selection.

In my book ‘Impartial Judgment‘ I made the point: we all need role models, and I feel I had the best. First and foremost was my father whose behavior and achievements I always sought to emulate. He never lectured me but showed me with his demeanor, actions, and language (I never heard him swear) the proper way to conduct oneself. I will include my mother in that description as well. While she carried the responsibility to raise her four children as a stay-at-home mom, she was much more than that. She instilled in me the importance of respecting others and treating others with kindness. Indeed, I was fortunate.

The responsibility for being a role model is a natural one for parents and many meet it willingly and selflessly. But sadly, many don’t or seem to be unable to, resulting in a vacuum of guidance for far too many youths. When this occurs, young people will gravitate towards surrogate role models. They need not be from the same family, social background, religion or ethnicity. What is important is one’s personal integrity and dedication to the work required for success in one’s life’s pursuits. I was lucky to have the advice of many wise people who crossed my path.

When I meet Jack Roosevelt Robinson, commonly known as Jackie, at the age of nine, I was immediately aware of the value this man (though he was just 19) who was of a different color and from a different background. I remember reading the book titled ‘Reach: 40 Black Men Speak on Living, Leading, and Succeeding‘, written by my friend and former NCAAP president, Ben Jealous, that chronicled stories about black men, both famous and infamous, who overcame arduous backgrounds to succeed in today’s world. Did Jealous’ book apply to black men only? Absolutely not! Or to men only? It did not. The path to success is a universal one.

Behavior is the model, not ethnicity or gender. One does not need to follow an athlete or movie star simply because they are more visible in their screen persona. Each person needs to admire and follow those whose core values are in concert with his or her own.

Many athletes try to model proper behavior. Some of them will and some will not, but the important lesson is to define our role models based on their virtues, not their notoriety.

Will you select your role models based on the quality of acceptable behavior?

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To contact Jim, go to JimTunney.com or email Jim@JimTunney.com.

Jim’s books are full of inspiration and interesting stories. Please visit his online store to learn more.

Another 101 Best of TunneySide of Sports

Be sure to get Jim’s book ‘Another 101 Best of TunneySide of Sports’ by clicking this link or using the email above to contact Jim directly.

These TunneySides take issues from real-life situations and relate them as inspiration for the betterment of others.

Jim is available for speaking engagements on leadership and T*E*A*M Building. His books are available for $20 which includes shipping and tax. The Tunney Bobblehead is available for $30. Please visit JimTunney.com. Thank you!

Posted in Tunney Side of Sports Columns | Leave a comment