I Really Enjoy

On the TUNNEYSIDE of SPORTS June 26, 2017 #646
On the TUNNEYSIDE of SPORTS June 26, 2017, #655 Up Next… “I really enjoy”

After further review…”I really enjoy watching you play” is one of the best statements parents can make to their youngsters who play sports. As the school year ends and summer athletic leagues begin, sports are a great avenue for youth to learn values that can serve them well later in life. However, all too often a child’s enjoyment can be diminished by overbearing parents who have forgotten that little leagues are not major leagues.

A recent headline caught my eye: “Can Parents Easily Get Coaches Removed?” Having sat in the stands as a parent, I have watched parents scream at their youngster for making a mistake or not making a play that from the stands appeared to be obvious. They berate coaches for not giving their child enough playing time or unleash a tirade on an umpire or referee for a call on the field. When a parent becomes too invested in the outcome of the game, their child is deprived of the experience of earning a victory or owning a defeat with any independence.

How about winning? If the T*E*A*M doesn’t win –- and that often means every game –parents blame the coach and want him/her removed. Too many parents inject themselves into the relationship between a coach and the players by offering their own advice or critiques. This undermines the very backbone of all organized sports, and the entire reason we have coaches in the first place. These parents seem to think that their kids need to be accustomed to winning all the time, and feeling that losing is unacceptable. But while a healthy competitive spirit is important, we all know that no one wins every game.

And that becomes one of the characteristics of playing any game! While playing to win should be the intent every time, the TunneySide sees value in the disappointment of coming up short. Learning how to personally deal with losing is a vital skill for an athlete as they move forward, and the competition gets more intense. It is a disadvantage for an individual who hasn’t properly learned how to experience losing because that resiliency can be applied in all facets of life – not just sports.

Sports can build self-esteem and confidence and that’s where parents – and coaches – can do the most good. All too often parents and coaches are mostly interested in developing game skills. Yet, the true value in sports is learning to develop the skill of self-confidence. When one develops that trait, dealing with life’s challenges becomes a less daunting task.

Will you log-in about parents’ role in being involved with their youngsters’ sports?

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To contact Jim, go to JimTunney.com or email Jim@JimTunney.com.

Jim’s books are full of inspiration and interesting stories. Please visit his online store to learn more.

Another 101 Best of TunneySide of Sports

Be sure to get Jim’s book ‘Another 101 Best of TunneySide of Sports’ by clicking this link or using the email above to contact Jim directly.

These TunneySides take issues from real-life situations and relate them as inspiration for the betterment of others.

Jim is available for speaking engagements on leadership and T*E*A*M Building. His books are available for $20 which includes shipping and tax. The Tunney Bobblehead is available for $30. Please visit JimTunney.com. Thank you!

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Unselfish!

Steve Kerr - Tunney Side of Sports
On the TUNNEYSIDE of SPORTS June 19, 2017, #654 Up Next… “Unselfish!”

After further review…Unselfish” was the blunt answer given by Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr following the Warriors 2017 NBA championship game, when a reporter asked him what was the key to their victory. The reporter, knowing Kerr, pressed for details and Kerr added “coaching.” He was just having fun, and it showed. After a brief pause, he continued saying, “Look at the talent standing behind me.” He was referring, of course, to the players. The inference was that anybody could have led such a group, and won the NBA championship.

When a T*E*A*M (Together Everyone Accomplishes More) doesn’t do well in a season, the coach is the first one on the firing line. Therefore, following their second championship in three years, it follows that Kerr deserves the same accolades given to the Warrior players. He should stand equally with Curry, Durant, Green, Thompson, Pachula, and Iguodala, and the others.

Kerr’s “have fun together” attitude was a vital ingredient of this historic season. But this is nothing new; it has been his demeanor since “Pali High” in Pacific Palisades, CA. and it carried on through his NCAA Final Four appearance with the Arizona Wildcats, 30 years ago. A distinguished NBA playing career followed, and then he has stayed in the game on the management side, leading to his success today as an ultimate coach. He retained that philosophy to get where he is today. Basketball is still a fun game in Steve Kerr’s mind.

The Warriors T*E*A*M is unselfish about who scores the basket, or who finishes the game with the most points, or the most triple-doubles, or who ends up as the MVP. In the 2017 championship season that MVP was Kevin Durant, who joined the Warriors only this season. Durant was not present for either of the two previous Finals appearances, yet the team embraced their star newcomer and celebrated his achievement with no jealous undercurrent. That only happens when a team is confident, unified, and selfless. And that can happen when the coach creates that type of environment.

Will you log-in on about the unselfish dynamic behind the Warriors’ championship?

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To contact Jim, go to JimTunney.com or email Jim@JimTunney.com.

Jim’s books are full of inspiration and interesting stories. Please visit his online store to learn more.

Another 101 Best of TunneySide of Sports

Be sure to get Jim’s book ‘Another 101 Best of TunneySide of Sports’ by clicking this link or using the email above to contact Jim directly.

These TunneySides take issues from real-life situations and relate them as inspiration for the betterment of others.

Posted in Sports, Tunney Side of Sports Columns | Leave a comment

Plunk ‘em!

Tunney Side of Sports
On the TUNNEYSIDE of SPORTS June 12, 2017, #644 Up Next… “Plunk ‘em!”

After further review…That unwritten rule in major league baseball has a “get-even” twist to it. San Francisco Giants pitcher Hunter Strickland threw a 98-mph fastball that hit Washington Nationals right fielder Bryce Harper on his right hip during a recent game at AT&T Park, in retaliation for a pair of home runs that Harper hit off him in the 2014 playoffs. There is little doubt that the intent of the pitch was to exact revenge for the home runs and Harper’s subsequent hubris trips around the bases when the two exchanged words. The irony is that the Giants went on not only to win that series but also the World Series that year! Wouldn’t that neutralize any hard feelings of a three-year-old grievance?

Harper charged the mound, dropping his bat as he left the batter’s box, then wildly throwing his batting helmet in Strickland’s direction. Punches by both players ensued, followed by both dugout benches charging the mound area, either to break-up that fight or maybe to land a few punches on their own; such scuffles usually have a little of both. Plate umpire Brian Gorman immediately ejected both players. Strickland was suspended for six games. Harper drew four.

Strickland received a longer suspension since as a relief pitcher he is not expected to appear in every game. Harper, an everyday position player, was given four games, but after his appeal, Major League Baseball authorities reduced his suspension to three games. The TunneySide doesn’t understand why Harper’s suspension was reduced. MLB had several days to review the evidence from the melee and decided on a four-game suspension. What new circumstances appeared that caused them to change that suspension?

A more important issue is why major league baseball permits such revenge tactics to continue. The unwritten rule of self-policing from the pitcher’s mound must be eliminated. In days gone by, some managers would encourage pitchers to “plunk” a batter, either to prove a point or to keep a long ball hitter from digging-in. The TunneySide believes that MLB managers today are not of that thinking. Yes, pitchers do throw “brush-back” pitches to keep the batter from crowding the plate and giving himself a better chance to reach balls on the outside corner. But they are strategic pitches, not assaults with a deadly weapon.

Throwing at a batter to intentionally hit him is an act of cowardice, and an admission by the pitcher that “I can’t defeat you within the rules, so take this!” Should an intentionally thrown pitch hit the batter’s head, concussion or even death may occur. It’s just too dangerous.

Will you log-in your opinion on a pitcher intentionally throwing at a batter?

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To contact Jim, go to JimTunney.com or email Jim@JimTunney.com.

Jim’s books are full of inspiration and interesting stories. Please visit his online store to learn more.

Another 101 Best of TunneySide of Sports

Be sure to get Jim’s book ‘Another 101 Best of TunneySide of Sports’ by clicking this link or using the email above to contact Jim directly.

These TunneySides take issues from real-life situations and relate them as inspiration for the betterment of others.

Posted in Sports, Tunney Side of Sports Columns | Leave a comment